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Tourist attractions

Information about places of interest to visit in and around Rushcliffe.

Rushcliffe and the surrounding area are full of brilliant places of interest to visit. There are a rich variety of listed buildings, conservation areas, sports facilities and parks and gardens, which all contribute to its local uniqueness, quality of life and sense of place.

Attractions

There are so many things to do here that it would be impossible to name them all, but we have listed some of the main attractions. For more information on other attractions, or things to do in Rushcliffe and Nottingham, visit the Nottinghamshire tourism web site.

Belvoir Castle

Ancestral home of the Duke of Rutland for one thousand years, Belvoir Castle is currently the family home of the 11th Duke, Duchess and their young family.

Website: Belvoir Castle

Flintham Museum

The Flintham Museum invites you back to the village shop in the days before supermarkets. Behind the recreated shop window of 1913, a range of goods has been attractively displayed. The village shop sold everything from pills and potions to pots and pans. If you can remember how much you could buy for sixpence or would like to find out, then you will enjoy a visit to the museum.

Research students are welcome to use the extensive archive by appointment. There are full disabled access and toilet facilities. The Museum is registered with the Museums and Galleries Commission and is a registered charity.

Website: Flintham Museum

Grantham Canal

Built two centuries ago, the Grantham Canal was instrumental in fostering industry and developing a transport route for the agricultural commodities within the Borough and through the Vale of Belvoir. The role of the canal has dramatically changed and now it is a recreational resource under the control of British Waterways. It is used by residents and visitors who enjoy walking and fishing as well as sketching or photography. 

Website: Grantham Canal

Manor Farm Animal Centre and Donkey Sanctuary

Situated in rolling countryside on the Nottinghamshire/Leicestershire border, the farm is just 20 minutes' drive from Nottingham and is set in more than 100 acres of woods and pastureland. There are over 50 breeds of animals and birds living at the farm, including rare kune kune pigs, pygmy goats and a jersey bullock. More than 50 wild bird species were recorded in the centre recently, and over 1,000 trees have been planted to encourage wildlife.

The centre offers a day out for all the family. In addition to animals, there are nature trails, a wildflower meadow and a children's play area and adventure playground. The centre has a café, and there are a range of facilities for people with disabilities, as well as baby changing facilities.

Website: Manor Farm

Naturescape Wild Flower Farm

Naturescape is a family-run business producing wildflower seeds, plants, native trees and shrubs. It has a wildlife garden, a dragonfly pond, picnic area and surrounding wetland meadow plus a tea-room serving home-made food.

Website: Naturescape

Nottingham Transport Heritage Centre and Great Central Railway

The Nottingham Transport Heritage Centre is the owner of the old Great Central Railway line from Ruddington to Loughborough junction in Leicestershire. Visitors can experience steam train journeys, view a collection of classic buses, and since the centre is set within Rushcliffe Country Park, there are plenty of scenic walks to enjoy.

Website: Nottingham Transport Heritage Centre

Ruddington Framework Knitters Museum

The museum is located in unique restored 19th Century workshops, cottages and frameshops containing the collection of handframes which can be seen working daily. There is also a working collection of circular sock machines, on which you can try your knitting skills. Experience the sight, sound and smell of working machinery and gain a fascinating insight into the life and labour of a 19th Century framework knitting community.

Website: Ruddington Framework Knitters Museum

Ruddington Village Museum

The museum occupies part of a mid-19th century school. It depicts the community life of Ruddington and consists of several reconstructed shops: an Edwardian fish and chip shop, a pharmacist, a cobbler, an ironmonger and a toy shop. There is also an Edwardian schoolroom, a collection of farm implements and temporary displays.

Website: Ruddington Village Museum

Sporting Facilities

Rushcliffe has specific strengths with regard to the provision of major sporting facilities. These play an important role in the tourism and visitor ‘offer’ for the Borough and Greater Nottingham as a whole, supporting the local economy and adding to the quality of life of residents. All of which make Rushcliffe an attractive place to live and work.

Nottingham Forest Football Club /The City Ground

Nottingham Forest Football Club, whose stadium is situated within Rushcliffe, celebrated 100 years at The City Ground in 1998. Over the last two decades, Forest have enjoyed considerable success particularly during the unforgettable Brian Clough era.

Website: Nottingham Forest

Trent Bridge Cricket Ground

Trent Bridge Cricket Ground is the home of Nottinghamshire County Cricket Club.

Situated in West Bridgford, Trent Bridge is known throughout the cricketing world and is regularly used for Test Match cricket. It is the third oldest ground in the world and in 1999 it celebrated 100 years of hosting international cricket.

Website: Trent Bridge Cricket Ground

National Water Sports Centre

Set in 270 acres of pleasant parkland, the National Water Sports Centre at Holme Pierrepont is one of the most comprehensive water sports facilities in the world, with its 2000m regatta lake, canoe slalom course and water ski tow lake. The enclosed waters make it ideal for beginners and improvers to enjoy the thrill of sailing, windsurfing, rowing, canoeing and water skiing.

Website: National Water Sports Centre


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